Sharing the road along the Cabot Trail, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, ca. 1920s.

Sharing the road along the Cabot Trail, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, ca. 1920s.

Vintage Valentine.
Vintage Valentine.
Passport for Cato Ramsay to emigrate to Nova Scotia, ca. 1783.
This document demonstrates that black refugees behind British lines needed passports to escape from America after the War of Independence. Indeed, some without passports were returned to their place of origin, which meant a return to slavery. Also, it makes clear that Ramsay initiated his freedom by escaping to the British lines, which certainly put his life at risk.

Passport for Cato Ramsay to emigrate to Nova Scotia, ca. 1783.

This document demonstrates that black refugees behind British lines needed passports to escape from America after the War of Independence. Indeed, some without passports were returned to their place of origin, which meant a return to slavery. Also, it makes clear that Ramsay initiated his freedom by escaping to the British lines, which certainly put his life at risk.

Group in the cabin of a passenger ship, ca. 1900.

Gentleman of the Red Cap Showshoe Club, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, ca. 1890.

The Red Cap Snowshoe Club was established in 1874 to encourage a taste for the winter exercise sport of snowshoeing and snowshoe racing. The society would later amend its bylaws to include all winter sports activities. For this early group photo, the Notman Studio photographed each member individually and then constructed a large composite photograph of the entire club.

Three young women of Annapolis County, ca. 1955.
This enchanting snapshot of young women in their summer dresses was likely taken outside Inglewood. The negative was developed and printed at Georgia Cunningham’s studio in nearby Bridgetown. A ‘colourized’ version of this photo is featured in the cover illustration of George Elliott Clarke’s Whylah Falls (Polestar Press, 1990).

Three young women of Annapolis County, ca. 1955.

This enchanting snapshot of young women in their summer dresses was likely taken outside Inglewood. The negative was developed and printed at Georgia Cunningham’s studio in nearby Bridgetown. A ‘colourized’ version of this photo is featured in the cover illustration of George Elliott Clarke’s Whylah Falls (Polestar Press, 1990).

"A black wood cutter at Shelburne, Nova Scotia" ca. 1788This watercolour sketch by Captain William Booth, Corps of Engineers, is the earliest known image of an African Nova Scotian person. He was probably a resident of Birchtown. According to Booth’s description of Birchtown, fishing was the chief occupation for “these poor, but really spirited people.” Those who could not get into the fishery worked as labourers, clearing land by the acre, cutting wood for fires, and hunting in season.

"A black wood cutter at Shelburne, Nova Scotia" ca. 1788

This watercolour sketch by Captain William Booth, Corps of Engineers, is the earliest known image of an African Nova Scotian person. He was probably a resident of Birchtown. 

According to Booth’s description of Birchtown, fishing was the chief occupation for “these poor, but really spirited people.” Those who could not get into the fishery worked as labourers, clearing land by the acre, cutting wood for fires, and hunting in season.

Noah’s Ark Skating Costume, Halifax, Nova Scotia, ca. 1890s.
Frances Gwendolyn Castens was the grand-daughter of Sir Samuel Cunard. Her somewhat unusual headpiece is complemented by a gown sporting appropriate fish, fowl and wildlife.Her grand-parents Gilbert W. Francklyn and Sarah Jane Cunard resided at “Emscote” a large property on the North West Arm, and gave their name to Francklyn Street and Francklyn Park sub-division

Noah’s Ark Skating Costume, Halifax, Nova Scotia, ca. 1890s.

Frances Gwendolyn Castens was the grand-daughter of Sir Samuel Cunard. Her somewhat unusual headpiece is complemented by a gown sporting appropriate fish, fowl and wildlife.Her grand-parents Gilbert W. Francklyn and Sarah Jane Cunard resided at “Emscote” a large property on the North West Arm, and gave their name to Francklyn Street and Francklyn Park sub-division

About 200 skaters and 1000 spectators attended the Carnival held in the South End Exhibition Rink (corner of Tower Road and Morris Street, near the present-day Cathedral Church of All Saints) in February 1899. The Halifax Daily Echo for 7 February described the participants:
The Royal Canadian regiment and St. Patrick’s bands rendered a splendid programme, including many waltzes, which the skaters and spectators enjoyed. The ice was never in better condition, and one well known skater said he had never seen a better sheet in his life. There was nothing very strikingly new in the costumes, though nearly all were very neat and some very pretty. There was only one group noticeable – the Geisha girls (Frank Stephen, D’Arcy Weatherbe and C. Grant) who were made up to represent three very presentable maidens. A lampshade costume, worn by Mrs. Green, was of crimpled paper arranged with pretty effect. Among the ladies who wore particularly nice costumes were Misses Burns and Seeton, as Black and White supplement; Miss Cameron, Yuletide; Miss Dimock, as Phyllis; Miss Darville, as an olden time lady, and Miss Farrell as Folly. Another costume that attracted notice was that of the Daisy, worn by a lady whose name was not among those registered. On a dark green dress were worked daisies, and she wore a little cape with a yellow centre near the neck and the petals falling over the shoulders. On her head was a hat which was a perfect representation of a large daisy, with a yellow centre and the rim of white petals. Among the gentlemen’s costumes was the Pink Un’, by Mr. Jones, R[oyal] A[rtillery]. It consisted of white satin knickerbockers, with pink satin cutaway coat and vest. A tall pink silk hat, with a miniature horse race on the crown, completed the costume, over which were scattered cards and sporting papers, the whole representing a well known English sporting paper. During the evening a couple of sets of lancers were danced, and these, with the waltzing, would give visitors an idea of how well Halifax people skate.

About 200 skaters and 1000 spectators attended the Carnival held in the South End Exhibition Rink (corner of Tower Road and Morris Street, near the present-day Cathedral Church of All Saints) in February 1899. The Halifax Daily Echo for 7 February described the participants:

The Royal Canadian regiment and St. Patrick’s bands rendered a splendid programme, including many waltzes, which the skaters and spectators enjoyed. The ice was never in better condition, and one well known skater said he had never seen a better sheet in his life. There was nothing very strikingly new in the costumes, though nearly all were very neat and some very pretty. There was only one group noticeable – the Geisha girls (Frank Stephen, D’Arcy Weatherbe and C. Grant) who were made up to represent three very presentable maidens. A lampshade costume, worn by Mrs. Green, was of crimpled paper arranged with pretty effect. Among the ladies who wore particularly nice costumes were Misses Burns and Seeton, as Black and White supplement; Miss Cameron, Yuletide; Miss Dimock, as Phyllis; Miss Darville, as an olden time lady, and Miss Farrell as Folly. Another costume that attracted notice was that of the Daisy, worn by a lady whose name was not among those registered. On a dark green dress were worked daisies, and she wore a little cape with a yellow centre near the neck and the petals falling over the shoulders. On her head was a hat which was a perfect representation of a large daisy, with a yellow centre and the rim of white petals. Among the gentlemen’s costumes was the Pink Un’, by Mr. Jones, R[oyal] A[rtillery]. It consisted of white satin knickerbockers, with pink satin cutaway coat and vest. A tall pink silk hat, with a miniature horse race on the crown, completed the costume, over which were scattered cards and sporting papers, the whole representing a well known English sporting paper. During the evening a couple of sets of lancers were danced, and these, with the waltzing, would give visitors an idea of how well Halifax people skate.